All The Light We Cannot See2017-04-21T22:40:55+00:00

All The Light We Cannot See

Anthony Doerr

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Why All The Light We Cannot See and Mont Blanc

I picked this book in connection with Mont Blanc because of the French setting. I wanted very much for this book to be in the selections because it is one of the best contemporary books I have read in the past ten years. The Pulitzer award winning book has the feel of a classic from the forties or fifties. It is a book I feel will endure very long into the future. It’s a story about unimaginable heartbreak, the horrors of war, and the resilience of the human spirit. It’s a story that also reminds the reader how we are all connected through humanity and how sometimes the smallest moment with one person can have a tremendous impact on someone’s life.

More About All The Light We Cannot See

All the Light We Cannot See is a novel written by American author Anthony Doerr, published by Scribner on May 6, 2014. It won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2015 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. The book was also a finalist for the National Book Award.

This beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.